Combined Heat and Power

Converting waste heat to power

Combined heat-and-power facilities (also called cogeneration, or cogen, plants) are designed to produce both heat and electricity from a single heat source.

All thermal power plants produce excess heat while generating electricity. This heat is often released into the natural environment through cooling towers, flue gas or other means. Cogen plants capture this excess heat -- which would be wasted in conventional power plants -- and use it for heating purposes. This means less fuel must be consumed to produce the same amount of useful energy, resulting in lower costs and CO2 emissions.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has set an aggressive goal to have combined heat and power comprise 20 percent of U.S. generation capacity by 2030. The DOE says that currently the vast majority of U.S. electricity generation does not make use of waste heat, resulting in an average utility-generation efficiency of 34 percent since the 1960s. The energy lost from wasted heat in the U.S. is greater than the total energy use of Japan.

ACCORDING TO THE UNITED STATES CLEAN HEAT & POWER ASSOCIATION, COMBINED-HEAT-AND-POWER SYSTEMS CURRENTLY:

• Produce almost 8 percent of U.S. electric power
• Save building and industry owners more than $5 billion per year in energy costs
• Decrease energy use by almost 1.3 trillion BTUs per year
• Reduce NOx emissions by 0.4 million tons per year
• Reduce CO2 emissions by over 0.9 million tons per year
• Prevent the release of over 35 million metric tons of carbon equivalent into the atmosphere

 
 
3340 Peachtree Road
Suite 170
Atlanta, GA 30326
USA

Phone: +1 904 825 0556
Email: info@mas-energy.com